Davidson's Fort Historic Park

Lackey Town Road, Old Fort, NC 28762
Tel: 828-668-4831

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE WEBSITE

Originally built to defend the frontier settlements against the Cherokee in 1776, the recreation of Davidsons Fort is history in action!

Come and see the recreation of Davidson's Fort, a Docent will be at Davidson's Fort on Saturdays from 9am to noon to give information about our history.

Each third Saturday a Colonial Living History will be presented with hands on demonstrations of the 18th Century. This event will have a gate admission of $2.00 per person 6 and older.

Major events will be presented 4 times a year, please see our Web Site for more detail. As always the fort is available for viewing and photographing 7 days a week.

For group tours or to book the Fort for your special event please call (828) 925-2095.

Originally built to defend the frontier settlements against the Cherokee in 1776, the recreation of Davidsons Fort is history in action!

Come and see the recreation of Davidson's Fort, a Docent will be at Davidson's Fort on Saturdays from 9am to noon to give information about our history.

Each third Saturday a Colonial Living History will be presented with hands on demonstrations of the 18th Century. This event will have a gate admission of $2.00 per person 6 and older.

Major events will be presented 4 times a year, please see our Web Site for more detail. As always the fort is available for viewing and photographing 7 days a week.

For group tours or to book the Fort for your special event please call (828) 925-2095.

Davidson’s Fort was built in 1776 by North Carolina Militia soldiers for the defense of settlers against the Cherokees.

Conflicts between Native Americans and European settlers were violent throughout the eighteenth century.  The conflict was primarily about land, as settlers continually broke treaties by moving into land reserved to the Cherokees.    In 1763, the British made a treaty with the Cherokee Nation agreeing that Europeans would not settle as far west as the Blue Ridge Mountains.   It has often been said that the crest of the Blue Ridge formed the border between colonial and Cherokee land, and this has been a simple way to explain the intended effect of the treaty.  The reality, however, is more complicated.  

According to the proclamation made by Governor Tryon when the treaty of 1763 was made, the boundary was a line beginning where the South Carolina boundary with the Cherokee ended at Reedy River.  The line then ran about 60 miles north to Tryon Mountain (now called White Oak Mountain, near Columbus, NC), then continued in a straight line to Chiswell’s mines in Virginia.  (You can find Tryon’s proclamation in The Colonial and State Records of North Carolina, edited by William L. Saunders, vol. VII, pp. 502-503; you can access this source online at docsouth.unc.edu/csr. ) According to this line, the present town of Old Fort lies west of the boundary in Cherokee territory.  

Another reality is that the settlers were pretty much prepared completely to disregard any treaty made by the King and his agents, and so continued moving further west.  Thus in the early to mid 1770’s several settler families took up land in what is now McDowell County, including the brothers John, Samuel, William, George and perhaps Thomas Davidson.

...Visit our website for more on this fascinating story, and come and see living history at Davidson's Fort!